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SHORT COMMUNICATION
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 17  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 115-116

Maternal and child survival in the context of sustainable development goals - Unfinished business


1 Vice-Principal Curriculum, Member of the Medical Education Unit and Institute Research Council, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India
2 Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth – Deemed to be University, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu, India

Date of Submission21-Sep-2019
Date of Acceptance12-Jan-2020
Date of Web Publication17-Mar-2020

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Saurabh RamBihariLal Shrivastava
Professor, Department of Community Medicine, Shri Sathya Sai Medical College and Research Institute, Sri Balaji Vidyapeeth (SBV) – Deemed to be University, Tiruporur - Guduvancherry Main Road, Ammapettai, Nellikuppam, Chengalpet District, Tamil Nadu - 603 108
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/MJBL.MJBL_73_19

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  Abstract 


The optimal wellbeing and health of mother and child has been regarded as one of the global public health priorities owing to their vulnerable nature in the different settings. However, the ground reality is quite alarming with more than 5.2 million deaths being reported in under-five year age-group. Even on the maternal front, the existing trends of maternal mortality and the progress which we have made, it is quite obvious that we will miss the global target by more than 1 million lives. The need of the hour is to accelerate the progress and this can happen only if the individual nation sets their own targets and formulate tailor-made strategies which will be successful in their own settings to accomplish a reduction in maternal and child deaths. In conclusion, a lot needs to be done to improve the maternal and child survival estimates and it will essentially require a collaborative approach from the concerned stakeholders and sectors.

Keywords: Maternal health, Universal health coverage, World Health Organization


How to cite this article:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Maternal and child survival in the context of sustainable development goals - Unfinished business. Med J Babylon 2020;17:115-6

How to cite this URL:
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS. Maternal and child survival in the context of sustainable development goals - Unfinished business. Med J Babylon [serial online] 2020 [cited 2020 Jul 4];17:115-6. Available from: http://www.medjbabylon.org/text.asp?2020/17/1/115/280730




  Introduction Top


The optimal wellbeing and health of mother and child has been regarded as one of the global public health priorities owing to their vulnerable nature in the different settings.[1] In fact, the maternal and child health issue has found a prominent place in both the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and also in the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).[2] With reference to the Goal 3 of SDGs, the target is to minimize the global maternal mortality ratio to <70/100,000 live births and to decrease newborn mortality to 12/1000 live births.[2],[3],[4] Eventually, the global leaders are aiming to eliminate all the deaths of mother and child resulting because of the preventable causes.[1],[2],[3]

Current situation

However, the ground reality is quite alarming, with more than 5.2 million deaths being reported in under5 years' age group, of which in excess of 2.6 million deaths were reported within the 1st month of the lives of newborn.[4] From the data available during the eras of both MDGs and SDGs, it was reported that major proportions of deaths were because of pneumonia, diarrhea, and birth complications.[4] In fact, it has been recommended that in excess of 50% of these deaths in under 5 years' age group could have easily been prevented or managed with the help of the application of simple and costeffective interventions such as immunization, good nutrition, and qualityassured care by trained health professionals.[1],[4]

Even on the maternal front, based on the existing trends of maternal mortality and the progress which we have made, it is quite obvious that we will miss the global target by more than 1 million lives.[2] Once again, the majority of the reported maternal deaths are resulting due to flaws in the delivery of the care during childbirth period and inability of the women to avail the services during their antenatal or postnatal period.[1],[2],[5] Women and their families have found it extremely difficult to access the healthcare facilities, and absence of trained health personnel or logistics or equipment in the rural and remote settings of low and middleincome nations has further complicated the problem.[2],[5]

Required actions

The need of the hour is to accelerate the progress, and this can happen only if the individual nation sets their own targets and formulate tailormade strategies which will be successful in their own settings to accomplish a reduction in maternal and child deaths.[2],[3] One of the crucial aspects is to aim for universal health coverage, which will enable and empower all women and children to access essential health service without suffering from the financial consequences.[1],[3] Moreover, there is a big time need for multisectoral involvement and the adoption of a multifaceted comprehensive approach.[4]

Other areas requiring attention

In addition, there is an immense need to strengthen the surveillance system pertaining to the deaths of both mother and child.[2],[3],[4] This can be accomplished by the strengthening of the civil registration and vital statistics systems in the developing nations, and all efforts should be taken for meeting the same.[2],[4] Further, we should always be on the lookout for the adoption of innovative strategies which can play a vital role in enhancing the access, coverage, and the quality of services such as adoption of mobile apps by the team of healthcare personnel.[1],[2],[4]


  Conclusion Top


In conclusion, a lot needs to be done to improve the maternal and child survival estimates, and it will essentially require a collaborative approach from the concerned stakeholders and sectors.

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
  References Top

1.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Inequality in health for women, infants, and children: An alarming public health concern. Int J Prev Med 2016;7:10.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
2.
WHO, UNICEF, UNFPA, World Bank Group and the United Nations Population Division. Maternal Mortality: Levels and Trends - 2000 to 2017; 2019. Available from: https://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/maternal-mortality-2000-2017/en/. [Last accessed on 2019 Sep 22].  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Masquelier B, Hug L, Sharrow D, You D, Hogan D, Hill K, et al. Global, regional, and national mortality trends in older children and young adolescents (5-14 years) from 1990 to 2016: An analysis of empirical data. Lancet Glob Health 2018;6:e1087-99.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
World Health Organization. Children: Reducing Mortality – Key Facts; 2019. Available from: https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/children-reducing-mortality. [Last accessed on 2019 Sep 22].  Back to cited text no. 4
    
5.
Shrivastava SR, Shrivastava PS, Ramasamy J. Reduction in global maternal mortality ratio far from expectation: So what next? J Curr Res Sci Med 2016;2:58-9.  Back to cited text no. 5
  [Full text]  




 

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